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 7 Must-See Monuments in America.

A 21-year-old American woman recently made the news for being the youngest person to visit every country in the world. She’s an extreme statistic since most people suffer from wanderlust but never leave their home country.

 

One of the hardest parts of traveling is deciding where to go first. Each country has their own monuments and popular tourist destinations.

Do you want to book a tour package or visit the famous Times Square in New York City? Wherever you want to go, there’s something for everyone in the family.

Vacations Can Be Educational AND Fun

Many people think the ideal vacation is relaxing by the beach with a good book. That is a great vacation, but beaches are often a very small selection of what a city, state or even country has to offer.

For history buffs and fact-nerds, exploring the history of a vacation destination is their idea of fun. Fun and education are not mutually exclusive.

7 Monuments to Visit in America

America may not have the history of ancient ruins from civilizations long gone. But the country does have monuments that pay tribute to its founders and other notable Americans. If you love history, these 7 monuments need to be added to your itinerary.

1. Visit the Washington Monument in Washington,

D.C. George Washington was one of the most prominent of America’s founding fathers. The nation’s first President is honored in America’s capital city with a stone structure standing over 500 feet tall. The world’s tallest obelisk is located in the National Mall, which is also home to the iconic Lincoln Memorial.

2. The Black Hills of South Dakota bear the face of history at Mount Rushmore.

South Dakota is one of the western states in America that is often overlooked and under-appreciated. In the early 1900s, a historian came up with the tourism-boosting idea of carving faces into the granite of the Black Hills.

George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, and Theodore Roosevelt were chosen as representatives for different aspects of American history. A secret room meant to inform future generations was left unfinished.

3. A trip to Montana includes a stop at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.

The battle between the U.S. and the Native American Indian tribes of the plains ended at the Little Bighorn River in Montana. Also known as Custer’s Last Stand, the monument memorializes those who lost their lives in the conflict.

4. Hear history ring at The Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

‘Hear’ in the metaphorical sense, as the bell is cracked and is only symbolic. American lore cites the ringing of the bell on July 4, 1776, when the vote for independence was made.

However, the vote wasn’t announced until July 8th, rendering the July 4th tale impossible, but still passed down through the generations.

5. Climb into the history of America at the Statue of Liberty in New York City, New York.

The Statue of Liberty is an even more iconic representation of America’s independence than even the Liberty Bell.

The sculpture of a torch-baring, the gowned goddess was a gift from France to the United States. Lady Liberty overlooks the New York Harbor and symbolized freedom to the incoming immigrants arriving by sea in the early 1900s.

6. Pay your respects at the USS Arizona Memorial in Hawaii.

Hawaii is a bucket-list destination for its sandy beaches and warm weather. However, it is also home to one of the worst military attacks on American soil. In 1941, over a thousand Americans were killed during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

7. Step into the past at the Bunker Hill Monument in Boston, Massachusetts.

One of the first military battles in America’s fight for independence occurred at Bunker Hill. The monument is one of the stops on the Freedom Trail, historical sites in Boston that paved America’s foundation.

Plan Your Trip Today

The Grand Canyon, Golden Gate Bridge, and White House are just a few of the most popular places for tourists to visit in America. However, the country is steeped in a rich history that goes beyond shiny lights and rock formations.

Visiting historical monuments is like going back in time to when America’s quest for independence was on everyone’s agenda.